As the father of a newborn baby boy, I’ve spent countless hours fretting over whether or not to circumcise my son, David. I used to consider the procedure relatively standard, but recently, I had a change of heart. I took a step back and began to consider the negative side of circumcision, which led me to a definitive conclusion: I refuse to circumcise my son because his foreskin keeps growing back.

Refusing to circumcise my son is no easy decision, but I’m confident it’s the right one. At first, I was adamant that I wanted David circumcised. But after considering various articles about how antiquated circumcision is and seeing David’s foreskin persistently grow back after each surgery, I started to reconsider my stance. After hours of research and nine circumcisions later, I decided that enough was enough.

It’s time we as a society agree that circumcision isn’t always the right choice, especially when your son’s foreskin is rewriting medical textbooks everywhere.

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Other parents may have their own reasons for or against circumcision, but I’ve made my choice, and I’m sticking to it. I fear that circumcision could impact my son’s quality of life. Just think: The sheer number of hospital visits necessary to keep up with his unconquerable foreskin would make David’s childhood anything but normal. Plus, with its current consistency of an all-terrain tire, his foreskin keeps getting harder and harder to cut off.

When I was born, my parents had me circumcised. I don’t hold any ill will towards them, nor do I wish it hadn’t happened. But I also lack the medical marvel of a penis that my son has. If my parents had experienced what I’m going through, they surely would’ve put an end to it. It’s time we as a society agree that circumcision isn’t always the right choice, especially when your son’s foreskin is rewriting medical textbooks everywhere.

Knowing what I know now, it’s hard to fathom that I was once pro-circumcision. The foreskin is a natural and apparently sometimes indestructible thing, and because of that, we parents need to leave it alone. If my son wants to take another crack at it when he grows up, that’s his decision, and he has every right to make it. My only words of advice to him would be, “Good luck. And maybe try using a pair of garden shears.”

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